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Speaker Series:Doug Tallamy

This event has passed.
Start:
September 17, 2014 @ 7:30 am
End:
September 17, 2014 @ 9:00 am
Cost:
Free
Category:


Doug Tallamy2

Trees Atlanta Kendeda Center

Coffee and pastries at 7:30 a.m.

Presentation begins at 8:00 a.m

A book signing of Tallamy’s book, Bringing Nature Home, will follow.
Eagle Eye Book Shop will have the book available for purchase following the lecture.

Available 1.5 ISA CEUs
Seats are limited & reservations are first come first served.

Reserve Your Seat

Please join us for an exciting morning of native tree education and a cup of coffee with Doug Tallamy. A professor and the chair of the Entomology and Wildlife Ecology department at University of Delaware, Dr. Tallamy has been studying insects and their role in the environment for over 20 years.  He has authored 79 research articles and has taught Insect Taxonomy, Behavioral Ecology, and other courses for 32 years. He is also Director of the Center for Managed Ecosystems. Chief among his research goals is to better understand the many ways insects interact with plants and how such interactions determine the diversity of animal communities.

His book, “Bringing Nature Home: How Native Plants Sustain Wildlife in Our Gardens,” was published by Timber Press in 2007 and was awarded the 2008 silver medal by the Garden Writer’s Association. The book has stimulated a national discussion about the need to share our living and working spaces with the biodiversity that runs our ecosystems. He gives 80-100 nation-wide talks per year describing the essential role that insects and the native plants that support them play in ecosystem function.  Dr. Tallamy’s lecture, Let It Be an Oak, will be an informative talk comparing oak species to other popular shade trees in terms of their ability to support animal diversity, protect watersheds, sequester carbon dioxide, and restore lost plant communities.

Special thanks to the City of Atlanta and the Georgia Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects for supporting this lecture event!

                             politifact_mugs_Atlanta_City_LOGO    ASLA_Georgia      

“Let It Be an Oak”

Once we have decided to restore the ecological integrity of our suburban neighborhoods we need to decide what plants to add to our properties. Oaks are superior trees for suburban restoration projects because of their many ecological and aesthetic attributes. Tallamy will compare oak species to other popular shade trees in terms of their ability to support animal diversity, protect watersheds, sequester carbon dioxide, and restore lost plant communities.

Doug’s background: 

As a child, Douglas W. Tallamy learned first-hand about the finality of suburban development as practiced today. Having recently moved with his family into a new house in Berkeley Heights, New Jersey, he spent his summer days exploring the “wild” places that surrounded him. One of his first discoveries was a small pond where thousands of pollywogs wiggled near its shoreline and he took great delight in watching them grow each day. One day as he watched, a bulldozer crested nearby piles of dirt, and — in an act that has been replicated around the nation millions of times since — proceeded to bury the young toads and all of the other living treasures within the pond.

Tallamy is currently Professor and Chair of the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware in Newark, Delaware, where he has written more than 65 research articles and has taught insect taxonomy, behavioral ecology, and other subjects. Chief among his research goals is to better understand the many ways insects interact with plants and how such interactions determine the diversity of animal communities.

In his free time Tallamy enjoys photography (particularly of insects and birds), hiking and backpacking with his wife in remote places, swimming and canoeing, and teaching young people about the importance of the life forms around them.

 Reserve Your Seat